TOMORROW: tao films advent calendar

It’s almost Xmas, and we have prepared something special for lovers of contemplative cinema. Our tao films advent calendar offers 24 previously unseen short films. Each short film is available for 1‚ā¨ only and for 24 hours only. The calendar is a sneak peek on what we will offer in 2018, and, of course, it’s a superb way to celebrate cinema and Xmas at the same time ūüėČ

So here’s the screening schedule for the coming three weeks. The special offer starts tomorrow, 1 December, midnight Central European Time. All films can be bought separately or you can buy the entire calendar in one go. Hope to see you around!! Don’t forget, you can discuss the films in our dedicated tao films community on Facebook. If you tweet about the calendar or want to give us a shoutout, please use the hashtag #taofilmsxmas

1 Dec РTHE SADNESS OF THE TREES by Scott Barley and Mikel Guillen
2 Dec РSHADOWS SET TO THE WEST by Manj Gill
3 Dec – SPIN OF YOUTH by¬†Jo√ęl Duinkerke
4 Dec – PASSAGE by Telemach Wiesinger
5 Dec РA PIOUS MAN by Alex Megaro
6 Dec РINGANNI by Salvatore Insana
7 Dec РTHE PAPERMAN by AbhirOop Basu
8 Dec РTHE EMPTY NEST by Marta Hernaiz Pidal
9 Dec РHUH by Filip Kojic
10 Dec РPSYCHOPOMP by Mariachiara Pernisa and Morgan Menegazzo
11 Dec РNOC by Pilar Palomero
12 Dec РMEMOIRE CARBONE by Pierre Villemin
13 Dec РWEDDING PREPARATIONS IN THE COUNTRY by Akash Sharma
14 Dec РA MIND OF ICE by Eli Hayes
15 Dec РAMPLIACION by Jaime Ignacio Grijalba Gómez
16 Dec РCARROZZERIA MISTA by Francis Magnenot and Katia Viscogliosi
17 Dec РQUIRO by Yudhajit Basu
18 Dec РMEER by Wolfgang Lehmann and Telemach Wiesinger
19 Dec РBRUSSELS NOTES by José Fernandez
20 Dec РFROM THE SIDE by Yefim Tovbis
21 Dec РPESCARE by Kevin Pontuti
22 Dec – OD EL-CAMINO by Martin Meija
23 Dec РTO TAKE ANOTHER HUMAN FORM by Jijo Sebastian Palatty
24 DEC РWHAT REMAINS by Enzo Cillo

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tao film selection and other news

Welcome to a new selection tao films films for you, handpicked just for you ūüôā Before you dive into it, let me say that tao films will start a free collection very soon. We’re currently preparing it. In order to give you a taster of our work, some films will be available for free on our platform. I’ll let you know once everything is up and running for this. And now, please welcome…

BYRON JONES by Ashish Pant (2013, US/India, 108min)

“If there is something that characterises contemporary ‚ÄúSlow Cinema‚ÄĚ in particular, then it is the directors‚Äô focus on the everyday. They hold a mirror in front of us, in front of our pains, our joys. Ashish Pant‚Äôs Byron Jones belongs to this category of filmmakers., but he stands out, taking the focus on the ordinary everyday further than other directors do. Byron Jones is a two-hour long portrait of an elderly man. We see him sleeping, showering, preparing meals, eating. In particular the last two daily habits might evoke in some viewers the memories of Chantal Akerman‚Äôs Jeanne Dielman; the almost hyper-real depiction of a woman‚Äôs day-to-day going ons. Jones, a widow perhaps, lives alone, which the director enhances with an almost oppressive silence that characterises the man‚Äôs solitude. With his insistence on showing Jones‚Äô daily activities in detail through the use of almost extreme long-takes, Pant has created a hyper-real portrait not only of Byron Jones, but of most of us.”

ART 35.5. HOURS A WEEK by Mariken Kramer and Eli Eines (2017, Norway, 22min)

“The front security door opens and the first visitors enter the National Gallery in Oslo. Another day at the gallery begins. But while this is another day of leisure for local visitors or foreign tourists, several coming from far away to see the classics, it is another day of work for the security guards who surveil the precious paintings the National Gallery is home to. Artist-filmmakers Mariken Kramer and Eli Eines, both alumni of the Trondheim Academy of Fine Art, focus in their documentary on the behind-the-scenes at the National Gallery, singling out those people who spent the most time with the paintings in front of them. In careful long takes, Kramer and Eines evoke the required slow look at a gallery, all the while speaking to the guards in order to learn about their work, but most importantly about their relationship to art. In the background of the directors‚Äô frames, viewers speed through the different rooms only to take a picture of a famous painting; a beautiful contrast that forces us to think about our relationship to art, our willingness to take time for what surrounds us, and our appreciation of it.”

ONE TIMES ONE by Chris Bell (2016, US, 20min)

“It is not easy to leave one‚Äôs home. It is even more difficult to build a life in another country, a country that is, perhaps, very different of one‚Äôs own. Ahmad emigrated to the US from Syria but struggles to find his feet. His days are spent idling, waiting for job opportunities that rarely arise for him. One Times One tells the story of Ahmad and a curious, if at times ambiguous, companionship with Mike, a 50-something American who lost his arm in an accident and keeps himself busy by drawing cartoon characters. Chris Bell uses the same patience he has shown in his feature film The Wind That Scatters in order to dig deeper into Ahmad‚Äôs daily life and struggles. It‚Äôs an episode that plays out so many times in our world that it gets overlooked and forgotten, but Bell brings it back into light and makes us aware of this enforced idleness that puts our life on hold.”

LADDER by Simo Ezoubeiri (2015, US/Morocco, 8min)

“An elderly man, alone, wakes up. He appears to be in a state of arrest. His movements are slow; he is sleepy. He is being drowned by something, something that weighs heavy on his shoulders. In one scene, we see a woman leaving the house with a suitcase. The house falls quiet, and it becomes clear what the weight on the man‚Äôs shoulder is. There is a profound sentiment of loss that Simo Ezoubeiri attempts to bring across in his film. The loss of a partner, through death of a break-up, causes a temporary stoppage of time and opens up a hole both in the person‚Äôs life and in the person itself. In long-takes which show the elderly man do nothing but idling, Ezoubeiri gets to the bottom of this sudden emptiness and loneliness, and lets us feel what it means to be left behind.”

KHOJI by Yudhajit Basu (2016, India, 20min)

“Set in the lower Himalayas, Yudhajit Basu‚Äôs short film Khoji is an ominous piece that uses the violent history of its people as a background in order to explore (and explain, perhaps) the people‚Äôs struggle today. And yet, this history is visually absent from the screen. In carefully framed long-takes, Basu lets the images speak as well as the dialogue in which parents consider sending their daughter to the city because it is no longer safe where they live. Or a dialogue in which a brother, almost surprised, asks his sister whether she wasn‚Äôt aware of what was happening in the neighbourhood. Something is happening; it hovers over Basu‚Äôs film, over every frame. The director suggests rather than tells, using still and quiet imagery that show resemblances to some of the big names in Slow Cinema.”

 

Other news

This autumn, Sebastian Eklund (director of¬†The Blind Waltz) will open his first solo exhibition at the Konstepidemin in G√∂teborg, Sweden. He’s a great visual artist, so if you’re in or around G√∂teborg, do use the chance and see his work.

Pilar Palomero has been awarded a Special Mention at the Sarajevo Film Festival for her film WINTER SUN. The special mention has been awarded by one of the festival’s partner in the larger context of the Bosnia and Herzegovina Student Programme Award. Congratulations!

If you want to learn ore about the director of Onere, Kevin Pontuti, there is a new interview with the filmmaker available, conducted as part of the short film programme of the Prague International Film Festival. You can read the interview here.

Scott Barley’s¬†Sleep Has Her House will have its Canadian theatrical premiere on 24 September as part of Art House Theatre Day. You can read more about the event and book tickets here.

La Pesca by by Pablo Alvarez screened at the Camden International Film Festival this month . The film will come to tao soon, and I cannot wait to show this beautiful short film to you!

More news about Kevin Pontuti. The filmmaker has taken the helm of a new study programme called “Media X” at the University of the Pacific this semester. You can read all about the director’s new university programme here.

While his short film¬†Ladder is being shown on tao films just now, Simo Ezoubeiri’s new project¬†Inner Marrakech¬†begins to travel the festival world, starting with the Kaohsiung Film Festival in Taiwan.

We hope you enjoy the new selection. Do join us in our tao films Facebook community, or follow our Facebook page, or our Twitter account for the latest updates on tao films and festival news from around the world.

Tao Films Selection and Other News

In the last six months, tao films has gone a long way. We started off with a mere six films in January that were replaced by a selection of eight films in April. By now, we have a permanent selection of 15 films available for streaming. And many more films are to come. We have around 80 short films and 50 feature films which wait to be uploaded, and we can’t wait for you to see them. But all in its own time…

This July, we have switched to a permanent collection, a library of films that cannot, for the most part, be found somewhere else. We pride ourselves with selecting films from mostly young and emerging talents from around the world in order to give them a chance to showcase their work. We have added 4 films this month, ranging from fiction films to experimental cinema.

In The Night of all Things/La Noche, director Pilar Palomero explores themes of loss as a result of death in connection with childhood. Her film is a quiet study, a study that makes palpable pain and grief transmitted through silence and the slow progression of time.

The night of all things – Pilar Palomero (2016)

Eli Hayes’¬†Mercury Vapor¬†is an experimental film that, over the course of two hours, asks you to free your mind, to be open to the moving images, not always clear, blurred at times, open to what is happening on your screen. Hayes does not tell a story; the story shapes up in your head alone. The film becomes what you see in the director’s images, and it is this characteristic which makes¬†Mercury Vapor¬†a special experience.¬†

Mercury Vapor – Eli Hayes (2017)

In his short film Onere, which is part of a larger project, Kevin Pontuti metaphorically explores the theme of self and the role of our identity. What does it mean to carry the weight of ourselves? Can we detach ourselves from our identity and choose a new one?

Onere – Kevin Pontuti (2016)

In A Place Called Lloyd, Danish director Sebastian Cordes takes us on a trip to Bolivia. Even though the national airline Lloyd Aereo Boliviano has gone bankrupt, its workers show up at their workplace every day. In at times vast and impressive shots, Cordes captures the stories of these people and their sense of dedication and pride. 

A place called Lloyd – Sebastian Cordes (2015)

Some films from season one have returned and others from season two have stayed on. We’re happy to say that the following films are also available on tao films:¬†Bare Romance¬†by Belgian director Karel Tuytschaever,¬†Centaur¬†by Aleksandra Niemczyk from Poland,¬†Ecce Homo¬†by Dimitar Kutmanov from Bulgaria,¬†Metropole¬†by Ozal Emier and Virginie Le Borgne from France/Lebanon,¬†Osmosis¬†by Nasos Karabelas from Greece,¬†Remains¬†by Yotam Ben-David from Israel,¬†Seaworld¬†by Hing Tsang from the UK,¬†Sixty Spanish Cigarettes¬†by Mark John Ostrowski from Spain,¬†A Souvenir from Switzerland¬†by Sorayos Prapapan from Thailand,¬†Transatlantique¬†by F√©lix Dufour-Laperri√®re¬†from Canada, and¬†Wanderer¬†by Martynas Kundrotas from Lithuania.¬†

In other news…

There is a lot happening with our filmmakers and they make us proud. First of all, we’re happy to say that Yudhajit Basu, whose film¬†Khoji¬†will show on tao next month, has been accepted at the prestigious National Film and Television School in India. Congratulations!¬†

Emily Cussins’¬†Diviner Intervention, to be released on tao soon, has been selected for the Science Arts Cinema Festival (if this is not a curious festival, we don’t know what is!).

Kevin Pontuti’s¬†Onere¬†keeps traveling to various festivals, so many, in fact, that I lose track of them.

Centaur by Aleksandra Niemczyk was screened at the International Film Festival in Madrid this month.

Félix Dufour-Laperrière, director of Transatlantique, is putting the finishing touches to Ville Neuve, his new film.

The Slow Short Film Festival, all new, will kick off in September and they have selected quite a few tao films. Check out the line-up, or rather impressive screen grabs of the selected films, on the official website. I’ll try to be there and maybe I meet some of you ūüôā

There is a lot going on, and I will keep you updated here on The Art(s) of Slow Cinema. Stay tuned!