Talks, talks, talks

As the new Flixwise podcast has just been released, I’d like to draw your attention to spoken rather than written words about Slow Cinema this time. I have had the opportunity to speak to three wonderful people about Slow Cinema, my slow interests, and my work.

The latest one is the new Flixwise podcast in which I had the chance to talk about Wang Bing’s West of the Tracks, reviewed on this blog not so long ago. This is from the podcast website:

“Martin is joined by film distributor and slow cinema guru Nadin Mai to discuss Wang Bing’s Tie Xi Qu: West of The Tracks, an over nine-hour long look at a collapsing industrial district in China. They look at how best to watch it, how it fits into Wang Bing’s body of work, whether it can even be classified as a documentary, and how it connects the present to the past. They switch rails to discuss the appeal of Slow Cinema. and then move on to look at the challenges and virtues of film distribution (where Martin admits to buying bootleg dvds).”

You can listen to the full episode here.

Then there is the Indie Beat podcast in which I speak to Chris Bell about my passion for Slow Cinema.

“This episode’s guest is Nadin Mai, a student-turned-distributor for Slow Cinema. Years ago she started a blog titled The Art of Slow Cinema, which was initially used for her doctoral thesis on Lav Diaz. The website grew, evolving into essays for other films of the same ilk, and her focus switched to spotlight films that had little love outside of the festival circuit (if that).”

You can listen to the full podcast here.

And then there is my chat with fellow slow TV guru Tim Prevett about my work. This comes via RedShift Radio. Check out our chat here.

This gives you about three hours of slow talk, which you can listen to whenever and wherever you want. I have become less static, more mobile. Take me with you on your way to work, or into the kitchen when you need to cook (as long as it’s something nice!) 🙂